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Apple just made a huge bet on its Apple Glass future

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If you’re excited for Apple Glass, then good news: Apple’s just poured a bunch of money into a company that’s likely going to contribute to the smart glasses’ development.

Texas-based optical technology manufacturer II-VI is getting a $410 million investment from Apple. Although the Apple’s announcement doesn’t detail what will be produced as a result of the investment, the money is being used to significantly expand a company that has the know how to help with augmented reality projects.

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Widely Hyped RTS Title Finally Has a Release Date on the Nintendo Switch!

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On the occasion of its second, 13 Sentinels: Aegis Rim is getting a much-needed Nintendo Switch port, and this has got the fans really excited. This was announced in a live stream earlier today, as seen in the video below.

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 13 Sentinels: Aegis Rim announced for Nintendo Switch

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13 Sentinels: Aegis Rim is one of the best games to play on PlayStation 4, and now it is on its way to the Nintendo Switch. The port will be arriving on Switch in Japan on April 14, 2022, which means players have to wait a while.

The pre-orders for this game will be going live from tomorrow.

This game will be priced at 6.980 Yen for the physical copy, which will include a reversible jacket. Every character will also receive two weapons which might require players to shell out an extra 26 Yen. The Japanese release will also feature recorded English voices as well.

The western release of the game’s Switch version is scheduled in North America and Europe for April 12, 2022, which is two days ahead of the Japanese launch. Watch the announcement trailer below.

WATCH THIS STORY – Toughest Video Game Bosses of All Time

 13 Sentinels: Aegis Rim is a massive hit for PS4

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13 Sentinels: Aegis Rim is one of the most massive hits for PlayStation 4 and has sold more than 300,000 copies worldwide. The game has obtained widespread reach in both Japan and the West ever since its launch in 2019.

13 Sentinels portrays the narrative of 13 youngsters who are forced to protect mankind against an all-powerful army of enormous monsters. Each high schooler, of course, flies their own Sentinel — enormous robots capable of battling toe-to-toe with mankind’s enigmatic foe.

The game will feature an insane amount of twists and turns but will definitely keep its players engaged to the core in its 30 hours of runtime. The characters are quite endearing and fit really well to support the narrative.

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What do you think of 13 Sentinels: Aegis Rim? Let us know in the comments.

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China faces ‘colossal’ Covid outbreak if it opens up like US: Study | World News

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China could see more than 600,000 Covid cases daily if it mimics anti-pandemic strategies implemented in the US, lifts travel bans, or drops its “zero-tolerance” approach against the virus, new research by Peking University experts said.

In the study, published last week by the Chinese Centre for Disease Control’s (CDC) weekly, four researchers have warned of a “colossal outbreak”, which would put an “unaffordable burden” on the country’s health system if Beijing moved away from its current anti-Covid strategies.

“More efficient vaccinations or more specific treatment, preferably the combination of both, are needed before entry-exit quarantine measures and other Covid response strategies in China can be safely lifted,” the study said.

“The estimates revealed the real possibility of a colossal outbreak which would almost certainly put an unbearable burden on the medical system,” the study added.

The research paper, titled On Coexistence with Covid-19: Estimations and Perspectives, compared China’s anti-epidemic measures with that of five other countries: the US, UK, Israel, Spain and France.

Despite local and even inter-provincial outbreaks in recent months, China has been able to control the spread of the coronavirus within the country since it first emerged from the central Chinese city of Wuhan in late 2019.

There were 98,631 total confirmed Covid cases on mainland China as of Saturday, while the death toll stood at 4,636.

Brushing aside criticism against the policy being “unsustainable”, China has continued to implement the “zero-Covid” policy through strict lockdowns for even a handful of cases, efficient contact tracing, hard quarantine measures, and controlled or closed international borders.

It also involves large-scale nucleic acid testing, and strict travel and health code management.

The new study concluded that the current policies would have to continue in China to prevent any new explosive outbreak of the disease. The study used data for August from the five countries with the researchers looking at the potential results if China adopted similar pandemic response strategies.

The study estimated that China would have 637,155 if it implements the same strategies as the US; 454,198 in the case of France; and 275,793 in the case of UK.

The research said four tenets for the safe transition from elimination strategies to open-up strategies were needed: Retain flexible non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPIs), maximise vaccination coverage, shield industries and vulnerable groups from the unintended consequences resulting from NPIs, and detect and isolate Covid promptly using extensive surveillance and stronger community social responsibility.

“However, due to the large population and relatively scarce health resources per capita in China, it is difficult to fully achieve tenets 1, 3, and 4, especially during a large-scale outbreak; therefore, China needs to be cautious about the decision on the open-up.”

The study raised a “clear warning that, for the time being, we are not ready to embrace ‘open-up’ strategies resting solely on the hypothesis of herd immunity induced by vaccination advocated by certain western countries”.

Separately, Wu Zunyou, chief epidemiologist at the Chinese CDC said on Sunday that without the zero-tolerance policy and prevention of overseas importation, there would have been “47.84 million infections and 950,000 deaths based on global pathogenicity and mortality rates”.

Wu added that China’s Covid prevention policies were similar to the other BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) countries, the country could have logged 54.97 million infections and over 1.14 million deaths.

Wu was speaking at Caijing magazine’s annual forecasts and strategies conference in Beijing on Sunday.

Wu said that “mathematical models show that Omicron is more contagious than Delta…but it’s clear that whatever the mutation, our public health measures are effective. Public health measures like wearing masks and social distancing are effective against all mutated strains”.

“The prevailing strains this winter and next spring are mainly the Delta strain. Whether the South African variant strain Omicron can develop into the dominant strain needs further observation,” Wu was quoted as saying by Chinese state media.

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Territory rights: Labor shock plot to put McMahon bill on agenda | The Canberra Times

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news, federal-politics, voluntary assisted dying, canberra, Katy Gallagher, Zed Seselja, Sam McMahon, Senate, Federal Parliament, Territory Rights

The push to restore the ACT’s right to legislate on voluntary assisted dying could reach the Federal Parliament as soon as Monday, under a shock Labor plot which threatens to stir further disruption in the Coalition in the final sitting week of the year. The Canberra Times can reveal Labor wants to take the rare step of forfeiting a slot allocated to one of its pieces of legislation to allow debate on Coalition Senator Sam McMahon’s bill to let the Northern Territory once again make assisted dying laws. If the debate goes ahead and clears key early hurdles, Labor’s Katy Gallagher will attempt to amend the bill to include the ACT. Senator McMahon chose to controversially exclude the ACT from her legislation after local senator and assisted dying opponent Zed Seselja signalled he wouldn’t support it. The chances of Senator Gallagher having the opportunity to amend the bill – let alone it reaching a final vote in the Senate on Monday – are small, given time constraints. But a debate would at least help to flush out where parliamentarians stand on the contentious issue. “The government should support this debate to occur and Zed should be standing up for his constituents and at least allowing the debate to happen – even if he remains opposed to the bill,” Senator Gallagher told The Canberra Times. The government has to agree to Labor’s surprise request, raising the prospect of more controversy on the floor of the Senate if it blocks debate on its Country Liberal colleagues’ bill for the second time in two weeks. The government last week overlooked Senator McMahon’s bill, choosing instead to allow debate on Pauline Hanson’s proposed anti-vaccine mandate laws. Senator McMahon was angered by the decision, accusing the One Nation leader of hijacking the government’s agenda with her threat to vote against all of its legislation unless it allowed debate on her bill. The NT senator, who will exit federal politics at the next election, had earlier been considering crossing the floor if her own bill was snubbed. She eventually made good on that threat when it came to the One Nation bill, siding with four of her Coalition colleagues to vote against the government’s position. It was a preclude to a chaotic week for the Morrison government, which saw seven Coalition members cross the floor over various pieces of legislation. The government’s decision to overlook the territory rights bill for debate last week seemingly ended all hope that it could be put to a vote before the looming federal election. But that was before Labor’s surprise intervention. READ MORE: Labor caucus had resolved to oppose Senator McMahon’s bill, although that was before she dumped the provisions it opposed related to land acquisitions and workplace laws. The federal Opposition has promised to prioritise debate on a repeal of the 1997 laws which block both territories from making assisted dying laws, if it wins the next election. The Canberra Times has this year been calling for a repeal of the so-called Andrews Bill as part of its Our Right to Decide campaign. Senator Gallagher had previously rebuffed Senator McMahon’s invitations to amend her bill to include the ACT, arguing a straight repeal of the 1997 laws was the “only way” to restore territory rights. But the Labor frontbencher’s position has softened. “If the Morrison government really cared about territories’ democratic rights they would have listed their own senator’s bill in their allocated slot last Monday,” Senator Gallagher said. “As we are nearing the end of this parliamentary term and as Senator McMahon is leaving the Senate at the election it made sense for two territory senators to work together to progress the debate on territory rights.” The Morrison government has previously indicated it had no plans to repeal the Andrews Bill. The Canberra Times understands Senator McMahon spoke up during last Tuesday’s Coalition party room meeting to push for a conscience vote on her bill. She did not respond to The Canberra Times’ requests for comment on Labor’s latest plan. Our journalists work hard to provide local, up-to-date news to the community. This is how you can continue to access our trusted content:

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