Connect with us

News

I Love You, Beth Cooper — Film Review – The Hollywood Reporter

Published

on

It’s always dangerous to introduce a movie character who loves to quote lines from classic movies; you’re forcing the audience to make comparisons, which are unlikely to favor the movie they’re watching.

In “I Love You, Beth Cooper” one of the teenage characters is a movie nerd constantly pontificating on some of his favorite flicks. During the course of his movie-mad monologues, Rich (Jack T. Carpenter) even conjures up a couple of memorable high school movies, “Risky Business” and “Dead Poets Society.” How we wish we were watching those pictures instead of the dud on display here. Although the teenage audience is notoriously undiscriminating, it’s hard to imagine many kids turning out for this laugh-free comedy.

Prodded by Rich, Denis (Paul Rust), the shy high school valedictorian, uses the occasion of his graduation speech to declare his love for Beth Cooper (Hayden Panettiere), the head cheerleader who is way out of his league. Although Beth barely has been aware of his existence, she is (rather improbably) touched by his declaration, and over the course of the evening, she and her snooty best friends take Denis and Rich on a night of adventure, pursued by Beth’s psychotic boyfriend, the school jock.

The movie written by Larry Doyle and directed by Chris Columbus recalls several earlier high school movies that took place over the course of a single day — “American Graffiti,” “The Breakfast Club” and “Superbad,” to name just a few. Actually, Columbus’ own directorial debut came on a comedy with a similar premise, “Adventures in Babysitting,” a sweet, clever trifle that seems like “Citizen Kane” in comparison to “Beth Cooper.”

Columbus went on to direct such huge hits as “Home Alone,” “Mrs. Doubtfire” and the first two “Harry Potter” movies, and somewhere along the way, he lost touch with recognizable human emotions. But it’s hard to know whether the blame for this fiasco rests with Columbus or with Doyle, who originally wrote a novel based on his high school experiences and then turned it into a screenplay. Despite the claims of autobiographical authenticity, nothing seems fresh. Most of the scenes are stock teen crises that we’ve seen many times before: Underage kids trying to buy beer, getting into a car wreck, fighting off vicious bullies.

The actors can’t do much with such a tired script. Rust doesn’t really distinguish himself from a hundred other movie geeks, but Panettiere finds some warmth and even poignancy in her character. If the movie were worth stealing, it would be stolen by Carpenter. He brings some panache to the picture, though Rich’s struggle to decide whether he’s gay is a running gag far less rewarding than the filmmakers realize.

The film was shot mainly around Vancouver, doubling for Tacoma, Wash., and Columbus has enough experience to serve up a handsome production. Some of the stunt work is impressive, but a comedy cries out for smart jokes rather than convincing fight scenes.

Opens: Friday, July 10 (Fox)

Continue Reading

News

Pakistan round-up: Rs 40bn irregularities in Imran’s Covid package, & more

Published

on

Pakistan’s total debt and liabilities have crossed Rs 50.5 trillion, an addition of Rs 20.7 trillion under the current government alone.

In June 2018, every Pakistani owed Rs 144,000, which increased to Rs 235,000 by September 2021, an additional burden of Rs 91,000 or 63% during PTI’s tenure.

The State Bank of Pakistan released the debt figures till September 2021, a day after Prime Minister Imran Khan described the increasing debt as a “national security issue”.

Pakistan will soon get $3 billion as loan from Saudi Arabia as the cabinet has approved an agreement to keep the amount in the country’s central bank.

Continue Reading

News

Tensions run high as Swiss vote on Covid vaccine certificate law | Switzerland

Published

on

People in Switzerland are voting on a Covid vaccine certificate law, after a campaign characterised by unprecedented levels of hostility in a country renowned for its culture of compromise.

As in much of Europe, Switzerland has seen growing anger over restrictions aimed at reining in the pandemic, and pressure to get vaccinated.

But in a country where there are referendums every few months in a climate of civility and measured debate, the soaring tensions around the vote have come as a shock. Police increased security around several politicians who have faced a flood of insults and death threats.

The polls close at noon (11am GMT) on Sunday, with the results expected within the following hours as the vast majority vote by mail before polling day.

Voters are deciding whether to approve amendments to the Covid law which, among other things, provide the legal basis for a Covid certificate that says if a person has been vaccinated or has recovered from the virus.

Opponents say the certificate, which has been required since September for access to restaurants and other indoor spaces and activities, is creating an “apartheid” system.

Final opinion polls showed about two-thirds of the voters supported the Covid laws.

Police blocked the square in front of the seat of government and parliament in Bern on Sunday, anticipating protests after the result.

Observers have warned that the vote could exacerbate tensions, and even spark a violent backlash among the anti-vaccine crowd if results do not go in their favour.

During the campaign, fences were erected around the buildings to protect them during anti-vax demonstrations.

They were often led by the “Freiheitstrychler” or “Freedom ringers” – men dressed in white shirts embroidered with edelweiss flowers and with two large cowbells suspended from a yoke resting on their shoulders.

Some of the demonstrations have led to violent clashes with police, who have used rubber bullets and teargas to rein in the crowds.

The referendum comes as the new Covid-19 variant Omicron, first detected in southern Africa and classified as a variant of concern, has rattled countries and markets around the world.

It is the second time in less than six months that the Swiss have been called on to vote on the government’s response to the pandemic. In June, 60% of voters approved prolonging national measures.

Continue Reading

News

James Austin Johnson is already the best ‘SNL’ Trump [POLL RESULTS]

Published

on

James Austin Johnson only just joined the cast of “Saturday Night Live” this fall, but he’s already made a big impression. The comedian not only played President Joe Biden in the opening sketch of the season but he’s also portrayed the former president, Donald Trump, to rave reviews. After decades of Trump impersonations on the late-night sketch series, fans have voiced their overwhelming support for the most recent one.

Johnson collected the vast majority of votes in our “best ‘SNL’ Trump” poll results, with a whopping 61% of the vote. The actor has only played him twice on “SNL,” though he has cultivated his impression of Trump for many years through viral videos. In a distant second place, Alec Baldwin collected 22% of the vote. Baldwin played Trump through his turbulent presidency and even won an Emmy for his performance in 2017, with additional nominations in 2018 and 2021.

Darrell Hammond came in third place at 10%, despite playing him for the longest period of time. Phil Hartman, the original Trump impressionist for “SNL,” placed in fourth at 3% of the vote. Johnson, Baldwin, Hammond and Hartman are the best-known Trump portrayers on the show, with all others playing the businessman in an episode or two.

Among that smaller group, Jason Sudeikis received 1% of the vote (though he won our “best ‘SNL’ Biden” poll), followed by Leslie Jones and Vanessa Bayer at 0.5%. Taran Killam, who actually played him in three episodes, and John Cena failed to collect a single vote in the poll.

Considering Trump has left office, it is likely that we will see less of Johnson’s impression on “SNL,” though they have already found a way to integrate him into multiple Judge Jeanine Pirro (Cecily Strong) cold opens.

Continue Reading

Trending