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Kyle Rittenhouse accuses Biden of ‘malice, defamation’

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Kyle Rittenhouse slammed Joe Biden for “defaming” his character when the president tweeted out a video suggesting the teen is a white supremacist.

“It’s actual malice, defaming my character for him to say something like that,” Rittenhouse told Fox News’ Tucker Carlson during an hour-long interview that aired Monday night.

Rittenhouse, who was acquitted on all charges last Friday in his highly-publicized murder trial, was responding to a question from Carlson about how he felt over the president’s comments.

Biden, when he was a presidential candidate in September 2020, had tweeted that “there’s no other way to put it: the President of the United States refused to disavow white supremacists on the debate stage last night,” referring to then-president Donald Trump.

The post, which includes a 50-second clip, refers to a question Fox News host Chris Wallace asked Trump during a presidential debate about whether he was willing “to condemn white supremacists and militia groups” in the wake of unrest in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and other American cities.

Kyle Rittenhouse and Tucker Carlson ÒRittenhouse told Carlson in exclusive interview
Kyle Rittenhouse did an exclusive interview with Tucker Carlson.
Fox News
Kyle Rittenhouse carries a weapon as he walks along Sheridan Road in Kenosha, Wis.,
Kyle Rittenhouse carries a weapon in Kenosha, Wis., Aug. 25, 2020.
Adam Rogan/The Journal Times via AP

The clip includes an image of Rittenhouse, 18, wielding a semi-automatic rifle.

Rittenhouse, in Monday night’s interview, also blasted Biden over his post-verdict prepared statement, where the president said he was “angry and concerned” over the trial’s outcome.

“Mr. President, if I could say one thing to you, I would urge you to go back and watch the trial and understand the facts before you make a statement,” Rittenhouse said.

President Joe Biden
Kyle Rittenhouse slammed Joe Biden for “defaming” his character.
AP Photo/Susan Walsh
A tear rolls down the cheek of Gaige Grosskreutz as he testifies about being shot in the right bicep, during the Kyle Rittenhouse trial in Kenosha Circuit Court, Monday, Nov. 8, 2021
A tear rolls down the cheek of Gaige Grosskreutz as he testifies about being shot in the right bicep, during the Kyle Rittenhouse trial in Kenosha Circuit Court, Monday, Nov. 8, 2021.
Mark Hertzberg/Pool Photo via AP

A jury cleared Rittenhouse of charges of homicide, attempted homicide and reckless endangerment on Friday in the deaths of Joseph Rosenbaum, 36, and Anthony Huber, 26, and the wounding of Gaige Grosskreutz, 27, on Aug. 25, 2020.

He was 17 when he brought a semi-automatic rifle and a medical kit to Kenosha in what he said was an effort to protect businesses as riots broke out over the police shooting of Jacob Blake, a black man who was left paralyzed from the waist down, on Aug. 23.

His attorneys argued that the teenager acted in self-defense when he opened fire.

The high-profile case created debate over whether Rittenhouse used his legal right to use weapons during the violence in Kenosha or whether he was a dangerous vigilante who escalated the tension.

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Fall Guys Season 6 Release Date and Expected Time

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Fall Guys Season 6 release time will soon be around and if you are excited about an even more troublesome obstacle in the game, you’d better get to know Pipe Dream!

Fall Guys Season 6 is just around the corner and it brings even more stages, more obstacles, and more costumes.

Pipe Dream is the biggest surprise of Mediatonik for the new season of Fall Guys. These vacuum pipes are a new way of traversing, but you need to enter the right pipe if you want to reach the finish line before the others. However, the bigger problem is that the destination of a pipe changes every time that a fall guy jumps into it. So, you just need to be lucky!

  • CHECK THIS OUT: GTA Trilogy HD Texture Pack Makes the Game Look the Way It Should

Other than that, there are 5 new rounds and over 25 new costumes available in Season 6.

Fall Guys | Season 6 Cinematic Trailer

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Fall Guys | Season 6 Cinematic Trailer

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Fall Guys Season 6 Release Date and Time

Fall Guys Season 6 will be available across all platforms on November 30. The developer never discloses the exact release time for the update as they want to take their time until the very last minute of the launch day if anything urgent comes up.

However, based on the release time of the previous seasons, Fall Guys Season 6 is expected to be available around 6 am PT/9 am ET/2 pm UTC/3 pm BST/4 pm CEST. Keep in mind that this is only an estimation, and the update could be available sooner or later than the aforementioned time.

Fall Guys Season 6 Content

  • Five dazzling Rounds
  • Outrageous new obstacles
  • 25+ fresh costumes
  • 50 tier Fame Path

Fall Guys is now available on PS4, PS5, and PC. The game is supposed to launch on Xbox One, Xbox Series X, Xbox Series S, and Nintendo Switch at some point until the end of this year.

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Biden Vaccine Rule for Health Workers Blocked in 10 States – U.S. News & World Report

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Biden Vaccine Rule for Health Workers Blocked in 10 States  U.S. News & World Report

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US intelligence community ‘struggled’ to brief Trump, CIA study says

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Although Trump spent substantial time with briefers on a routine basis throughout the transition period, his free-wheeling style and deep mistrust of the intelligence community presented them with “greater challenges” even than President-elect Richard Nixon, who blamed the CIA for his election loss in 1960 and cut the agency out as president, the history found.

The 40-page narrative — a regular update to a CIA book on briefing presidents-elect written by a retired intelligence officer — offers only a few new details but confirms widely reported press accounts of the former President’s approach to intelligence.
It offers an inside window into the intelligence community’s struggle to adjust to a president who was “suspicious and insecure about the intelligence process” and, in the words of former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, prone to “fly off on tangents.” And it narrates how, at every turn, the relationship between the new President and the intelligence community was undermined by the political imbroglio stemming from the Trump campaign’s alleged relationship to Russia.

“Looking back at the Trump transition, one must conclude that the IC achieved only limited success with what had always been its two fundamental goals with the briefing process: to assist the president-elect in becoming familiar with foreign developments and threats affecting US interests with which he would have to deal once in office; and to establish a relationship with the new president and his team in which they understood how they could draw on the Intelligence Community to assist them in discharging their responsibilities,” the history recounts.

‘The system worked, but it struggled.’

The history reports that during the transition period, Trump was typically “pleasant and courteous” during his briefings, which were given by career intelligence officers drawn from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, the CIA, the Defense Intelligence Agency, the FBI and the Department of State. Together, the team of 14 briefers “comprised the largest and most organizationally diverse group of experts ever deployed for transition briefings of candidates and presidents-elect.”

Even later in his presidency, at moments when Trump was publicly expressing deep frustration with the intelligence community, “briefings continued as usual and Trump’s demeanor during the sessions remained the same,” the history reports.

But as the intelligence community was drawn into the major political dramas surrounding Trump — in particular, the public furor over a dossier compiled by a former British intelligence officer containing purported compromising information on the president-elect that Trump believed had been leaked by the IC — he increasingly lashed out at the intelligence community in public.

According to one previously unreported anecdote, Trump during his second pre-election briefing on Sept. 2, 2016 assured his briefers that “the nasty things he was saying publicly about the intelligence community “don’t apply to you.”

“Trump was like Nixon, suspicious and insecure about the intelligence process, but unlike Nixon in the way he reacted,” the history reads. “Rather than shut the IC out, Trump engaged with it, but attacked it publicly.”

Clapper says Trump was ‘fact-free’

The history also confirms myriad press accounts of Trump’s dissociative style during intelligence briefings.

“The irreconcilable difference, in Clapper’s view, was that the IC worked with evidence,” according to the history. “Trump ‘was fact-free—evidence doesn’t cut it with him,'” according to Clapper.

Trump rarely, if at all, read the daily classified briefing book prepared for him during the transition, according to the lead intelligence analyst responsible for briefing the president-elect.

“He touched it. He doesn’t really read anything,” the history quotes Ted Gistaro, the career CIA analyst tapped for the job. Still, as is typical, the intelligence community tailored the briefing book to the new president, reducing the number and the length of articles. Former Vice President Mike Pence reportedly told briefers to “lean forward on maps.” Clapper agreed with Gistaro, saying “Trump doesn’t read much; he likes bullets.”

Trump would “listen to the key points, discuss them with some care, then lead the discussion to related issues and others further afield,” according to the history.

Unlike previous presidents-elect — and some members of his own national security team — Trump himself received no briefings on the CIA’s covert action programs until several weeks after his inauguration. The history terms this chain of events “a significant departure from the way briefings were handled during the previous two transitions,” but does not offer an explanation.

The history primarily focuses on Trump’s time as a candidate and president-elect, and only briefly covers his relations with the intelligence community during his presidency. It reports that after the 2020 election, Trump’s “PDB” — his presidential daily briefing — continued only for a time.

Trump typically received the PDB twice a week while in office. He was scheduled to resume receiving the PDB on January 6 after a holiday break, the history reveals. But according to an interview with Beth Sanner, Trump’s regular briefer, none were scheduled after the assault on the US Capitol that took place that day.

The history also provides some insight into briefings given to 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, recounting one pre-election intelligence briefing given to Clinton at the FBI field office in White Plains, New York, in August of that year.

“Given all that Clinton was going through related to her handling of personal emails during the campaign, Gistaro regretted that the first question the security officer asked Clinton as she approached the room was whether she had any cell phones with her,” the history recounts. “The Secretary very professionally assured the questioner that she had left her cell phones at home.

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