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Matthew McConaughey Blasts Anti-Maskers to Carlos Watson

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Matthew McConaughey opened up about his potential gubernatorial run, laying out his political goals while also blasting anti-maskers.

The actor referred to masks as a “short-term inconvenience for long-term freedom” while speaking to Carlos Watson for an interview on the OZY CEO’s talk show.

“We have got to make some sacrifices for larger rewards tomorrow,” McConaughey said during the episode’s promo, released Thursday, referencing the “damn dispute over the masks that got politicized.”

McConaughey has been vocally team mask throughout the pandemic, releasing a video showing his followers how to craft a face covering with just a bandana, a coffee filter, and some rubber bands.

“I’m not believing you’re really scared of this little cotton thing. I don’t really feel that takes away your identity and your freedom,” McConaughey said to Watson about anti-maskers, adding, “There’s no data that says it’s not a good thing. No data that says it’s harmful.”

McConaughey also teased his potential run for Governor of Texas, revealing he is “not interested in going and putting a bunch of Band-Aids on that are gonna be ripped off” as soon as he were to leave office.

“I’m interested in building something that can last, and I’m measuring what category that is. I don’t know if that’s politics,” he said, while also adding, “I trust my core beliefs enough and my values enough to feel comfortable listening to and opposing.”

Watch above, via YouTube.

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Donald Trump denies being ‘bored’ during meeting with Prince Charles – ‘Not at all!’ | Royal | News

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The former US resident , 75, appeared on GB News for an interview with the UK politician-turned-broadcaster, 57, on Wednesday night. The 45th president of the US spoke about many topical issues from his Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, south Florida, including his meeting with Prince Charles, 73.

Mr Farage asked the former president whether he was bored during the meeting after discussing other Royal Family members.

However, Mr Trump denied the claims he was disinterested in meeting the future King.

He said: “No, I wasn’t bored.

“I like Charles. He’s an environmentalist.

READ MORE: Queen wished to leave Obama’s banquet early for hilarious reason

The pair met in 2019 when Trump arrived in the UK for a state visit in the summer and again in December when Trump and the first lady flew to London for a NATO summit.

Despite holding different positions over the issue of the environment, a Clarence House spokesman told CNN at the time Donald Trump and the Prince of Wales have developed a “good working relationship” since the visit.

Mr Farage also brought the Sussexes into the conversation, but the former president was not as keen on the couple as he was Charles.

He told the broadcaster of Meghan Markle: “Not a fan of hers. I wasn’t from day one.”

However, he didn’t hold such reservations for the monarch who he met during the same visit.

He told Mr Farage: “She’s a fantastic woman.

“And we had a great time together and an evening the likes of which you rarely would see.

“She was laughing and smiling, we got along great.

“We talked the whole night. She is a great, wonderful woman.”

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Will the Omicron Covid variant cancel Christmas? | News

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The identification of a new Covid variant has sent shockwaves around the world as leaders scramble once again to close borders and reintroduce measures aimed at slowing the spread of the virus. The World Health Organization has said Omicron poses a very high risk of infection. Its ability to evade Covid vaccines is of particular concern, and the chief executive of the US drugmaker Moderna has warned there is no world where the effectiveness of vaccines is at the same level as with the Delta variant.

The Guardian’s science correspondent Nicola Davis tells Hannah Moore the variant is so new to scientists there is not enough data to predict how serious a threat it could pose, but the next two weeks will be crucial.

However, the emergence of a new “variant of concern” is no surprise. For months scientists have warned that the inequitable distribution of vaccines means that with so many people unvaccinated, there is huge scope for dangerous new variants to mutate.



Woman in a protective suit and mask holding a test tube with a sample suspected to be infected with the Omicron Covid variant. Photograph by Maxym Marusenko/NurPhoto/Rex/Shutterstock

Photograph: Maxym Marusenko/NurPhoto/REX/Shutterstock

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EU countries should discuss mandatory Covid-19 vaccination: Von der Leyen

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The European Union (EU) should start a discussion on whether mandatory vaccinations are needed in the fight against the ongoing surge in Covid-19 cases, especially since a third of the EU population had not yet taken the jab, European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said in Brussels.


Acknowledging that such a decision was “pure member state competence,” she noted that around 150 million people in the EU had not taken the jab.





“I think it is understandable and appropriate to lead this discussion now — how we can encourage and potentially think about mandatory vaccination within the EU,” she added on Wednesday during a news conference.


“We have the vaccines, the life-saving vaccines, but they are not being used adequately everywhere,” she said.


Von der Leyen added that the EU’s main Covid-19 vaccine provider, BioNTech or Pfizer, would have shots available for children in the bloc in two weeks, Xinhua news agency reported.


The Commission President said there was not enough information on the new Covid-19 variant, Omicron, which the World Health Organization said poses a high risk.


“We do not know all about this variant but know enough to be concerned,” she added.


“We know from our experience with the Delta variant that it is a race against time. Till we know more, in two to three weeks, we need to take action. Our best scientists are working day and night. What science tells us already is that full vaccination and boosters give protection against the virus.”


–IANS


int/khz/


 

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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