Home News Paul Walker’s Toyota Supra from Fast & Furious Sells for Record $550,000

Paul Walker’s Toyota Supra from Fast & Furious Sells for Record $550,000

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This yellow machine doesn’t need an introduction, but we’ll give one anyway. The FF franchise has been a rollercoaster of fun, races, “family” and epic stunts. 20 years later, the orange Supra is still the most iconic vehicle they ever had.

Fast & Furious tried to capture the essence of the American street racing scene in the 1990s. Everybody knows that the 2JZ inline-six engine can be modified to produce a “10-second car,” but as is often the case with movie cars, this one is completely stock because they couldn’t risk mechanical problems during filming.

The one Paul Walker’s character Brian O’Conner drove was supposed to have a Turbonetics T-66 ball-bearing turbo, custom stainless headers, GReddy exhaust, a billet flywheel, and an extra 100 hp just from the NOS. In the movie, the car is a junkyard wreck and becomes fast enough to smoke Ferraris after they put about $15,000 of mods into it.

However, it doesn’t disappoint in the looks department. The iconic candy orange paint is stolen from the Lamborghini Diablo and has been matched by multiple decals and the famous “Nuclear Gladiator” side graphics designed by Troy Lee.

Other changes include the TRD-style vented hood, a Bomex body kit, twin APR aluminum rear wing, and 19-inch Dazz Motorsport Racing Hart M5 wheels. The mods were done by Eddie Paul at The Shark Shop in El Segundo in California. For the sequel, 2 Fast 2 Furious, the Supra got converted into Slap Jack’s golden car. But after shooting, the mods were reverted, which is probably why the finish looks so good.

From what we understand, the car Barrett Jackson just sold in Las Vegas for $550,000 looks like it has a manual but is actually the humble automatic. Six years ago, another one of the Supras they built for the first movie sold for $185,000, and that one had a naturally aspirated inline-six engine and a five-speed manual. So it’s safe to assume people aren’t buying them to go drag racing.

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