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‘Surviving Disaster’ host Cade Courtley on leaving Hollywood: I couldn’t express my ‘love for this country’

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When Navy SEAL Christopher “Cade” Courtley left the military after nearly 10 years, he knew he could never stomach the daily grind of working a desk job. He was too hardened.

The author and former host of Spike TV’s “Surviving Disaster” told Fox News he was “living a double life” when he exited active duty, explaining that in the months before his final salute, Courtley, 52, had begun performing stunt work in San Diego, California.

There, he fell in love with the prospect of doing high-octane, adrenaline-pumping maneuvers for a paycheck. He soon moved to Los Angeles, where he began cutting his teeth as a more seasoned on-camera talent – not as an actor but as a guy with a story to tell.

“It was a natural progression for a guy in the SEAL teams; it just kind of made sense,” said Courtley. “I was doing more and more of that. I was meeting some of the people, the directors, but it didn’t take long to realize that while I was a piss-poor actor, I could string sentences together.”

However, while Courtley “enjoyed the production process,” which had its own perks, he still had to make a living, and it wasn’t until a near-death experience in Iraq that Courtley was presented with a “Godfather”-like offer he couldn’t refuse.

“So in between spending time in L.A. and trying to get involved in that business but still having to pay the bills – going overseas to Iraq and Afghanistan and working for an agency as a contractor, bouncing back and forth – I was on a trip over in Iraq and I got a call from a producer friend of mine,” Courtley explained.

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“He said, ‘Hey, we’re starting this new TV show that you’d be the perfect host for about surviving disaster situations – what do you think?’” he said. “All of a sudden – like clockwork, there’s a boom that went off in the background and he’s like, ‘What the hell is that?’ I go, ‘That was an IED, so if you guys are serious, call my lawyer, let’s do a deal, I’ll come on back and we’ll give this a try.’ So I spent the next four or five years doing several different TV show productions and things like that and it was fun.”

“Surviving Disaster” premiered in 2009 and would run for one season. Ultimately, Courtley said he left Hollywood about five years ago because he didn’t feel he could express his “true core values” and “love for this country.”

“I guess every individual has to make a decision. What’s important to you? Being able to freely express your opinions and your beliefs? Because if you can’t do that, I can’t think of anything more un-American than being afraid of expressing your opinion and if you express your opinion in that business,” Courtley said. 

Cade Courtley, a former Navy SEAL from Austin, Texas, appears on ‘Shark Tank’ to pitch his patriotic coffee business Victory Coffees in June 2016. (Michael Desmond/Walt Disney Television via Getty Images)

Cade Courtley, a former Navy SEAL from Austin, Texas, appears on ‘Shark Tank’ to pitch his patriotic coffee business Victory Coffees in June 2016. (Michael Desmond/Walt Disney Television via Getty Images)

“You’re not going to be working in that business if you have patriotic or conservative values. That’s just the reality of that business. So I made a personal decision that my beliefs are more important than getting a pretty decent paycheck in that town and having my own TV show. And I am super happy with that decision,” he continued. 

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Now, Courtley runs Victory CoffeesCLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR ENTERTAINMENT NEWSLETTER

“And if somebody doesn’t like it or hates you, you still have to press on and continue to have those beliefs and that conviction,” he said. “And if we do that, the cancel culture will be canceled. It will just go away when people realize, ‘Hey, they are not reacting to this anymore. They’re pressing on with their opinions, their beliefs, their convictions and cancel culture will be gone.’ But as long as people placate to a few of the fringe folks that just can’t stand what you believe in, this will continue and grow. So we really need people to step up and be strong right now.”

Courtley’s suggestion? “Get out of your bubble” and “push your comfort zone a little bit and learn something new.”

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“Try the victory challenge. Let’s try and understand this a little bit. Get a hot cup of coffee, bring down the temperature and start your day with a victory,” he added.

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‘Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ Season 4 Teaser and Release Date Are Announced

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‘Marvelous Mrs. Maisel’ Season 4 Teaser and Release Date Are Announced | Entertainment Tonight


































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QAnon Follower Writes Open Letter to Trump, Says Predictions Are False

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  • Donny Warren wrote to Trump expressing his frustration about QAnon’s inaccurate predictions.
  • The conspiracy movement believed a supposed group of “deep state” elites would be arrested in October.
  • Warren complained that the group’s conspiracy theories kept turning out not to be true.

AQAnon supporter wrote an open letter to Donald Trump expressing his frustration that the conspiracy theories pushed by the movement kept failing to happen.

Donny Warren’s letter, which was reviewed by Insider, appeared on the Telegram channel of the prominent QAnon adherent Ron Watkins on Sunday. It was first reported by Newsweek.

Adherents of the far-right group believe, baselessly, that a global cabal of Satan-worshipping pedophiles were embedded in institutions including the “deep state” and the Democratic Party, and were responsible for mind control and other nefarious acts.

They also believe that former President Donald Trump was elected president as part of a plot to launch a counter-coup against that cabal.

In his letter, Warren complained that “Red October” — one of the multiple dates on which leading QAnon proponents promised that the alleged cabal would be rounded up and arrested — had not come to pass.

“At the beginning of October, we were told of a Red October, with rumors of mass arrests across the world,” Warren wrote. 

“We were given hints by ‘Q’ experts that November was to be THE month,” he wrote. “I told a few of my awake friends that either this would be the best Thanksgiving ever, or the worst. Guess which one it was?”

The term “awake” is used to describe other adherents of the QAnon movement and is a reference to “The Great Awakening,” an event in January when Trump was supposed to declare martial law and imprison his political enemies — which also did not happen.

“For months, I have anticipated each day with excitement knowing that I was watching my president and his crew of Patriots take back our country and our freedom. I am losing that excitement now,” Warren said. “This is starting to get very old.”

Warren also described the toll that his belief in the conspiracy theory was taking on his family, writing: “They think I am a nut for believing in all this.”

The letter was addressed to Trump, his former national security advisor Michael Flynn, Russian President Vladimir Putin, Chinese President Xi Jinping, and John F. Kennedy Jr., “if he is alive.”

Hundreds of QAnon supporters gathered in Dallas earlier in November in the belief that Kennedy Jr., who died in 1999, would reappear and announce that he wasn’t dead.

Tom Porter contributed reporting.

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Expert groups considering scientific evidence on need for booster dose- The New Indian Express

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By PTI

NEW DELHI: The National Technical Advisory Group on Immunization (NTAGI) and National Expert Group on Vaccine Administration for COVID-19 (NEGVAC) are deliberating and considering scientific evidence for the need and justification for booster dose, Rajya Sabha was told on Tuesday.

Responding to a query on the stand of the Indian Government on booster doses, Union Minister of State for Health Bharati Pravin Pawar in a written reply said some countries are providing booster doses of COVID-19 vaccine.

“The National Technical Advisory Group on Immunization (NTAGI) and National Expert Group on Vaccine Administration for COVID-19 (NEGVAC) are deliberating and considering scientific evidences related to dose schedule of COVID vaccines as well as the need and justification for booster dose,” she said.

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