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Trump could still face money laundering investigation over Scottish golf course after judge rules courts should decide

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Scottish courts have rejected a legal bid to force lawmakers to investigate Donald Trump’s purchase of his two prized golf resorts in the country.

The nation’s top prosecutor will now have to decide whether to pursue an investigation into how the former president paid for his Trump Turnberry course in 2014, and Trump International Golf Links near Aberdeen eight years earlier.

New York-based human rights organisation Avaaz had argued that the Scottish Government should have embarked on an unexplained wealth order probe into how the deals were financed.

However, in a written judgment released on Thursday, Judge Craig Sandison ruled Scottish ministers had acted lawfully in declining to take the investigation.

“I wish to make it clear that I express no view whatsoever on the question of whether the [criminal law] requirements were or appeared to be met in the case of President Trump,” wrote Judge Sandison.

“Further, for aught yet seen the Scottish Ministers may still make a UWO application in relation to President Trump’s Scottish assets.”

The case will now fall to Lord Advocate Dorothy Bain to decide whether to pursue a criminal investigation.

Mr Trump paid $60m in cash to buy Trump Turnberry in 2014, a deal that drew attention during his presidency as his finances were pored over by the press.

The self-described “King of Debt” had built his business empire by borrowing money through opaque financial deals.

However in the nine years leading to his election as president, Mr Trump spent $400m in cash on new properties, including buying 14 properties outright without borrowing a cent from any bank, The Washington Post reported in 2018.

Avaaz called on Scottish and US governments to investigate the origins of Mr Trump’s millions in spending.

The Scottish Green Party also called for an unexplained wealth order into Mr Trump’s finances, the BBC reported.

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said it was up to the courts to decide whether to investigate the purchase of the two golf resorts.

Donald Trump cuts a ribbon on the 9th tee at his Trump Turnberry Resort surrounded by his family in 2016

(Getty Images)

However, former Justice Secretary Humza Yousaf contradicted Ms Sturgeon, and said the Government did have jurisdiction for an unexplained wealth order investigation.

Avaaz, which is pursuing similar court action against Mr Trump in the US, then appealed to the Court of Session, Scotland’s highest civil court, who ruled the Government did not need to act.

Thursday’s ruling means the politically-charged case will be sent back to Ms Bain, who is the equivalent of an attorney general in Scotland.

After the decision. Avaaz’s legal director Nick Flynn said the time had come for a full investigation.

“The law may have been clarified, but a cloud of suspicion still hangs over Trump’s purchase of Turnberry,” he said in a statement.

“By any measure, the threshold to pursue a UWO to investigate the purchase has easily been crossed. The Lord Advocate should take urgent action in the interest of the rule of law and transparency, and demand a clear explanation of where the $60m used to buy Turnberry came from,” he said.

The Trump Scotland group did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Independent.

Eric Trump has previously described the investigation as “pathetic” and said it would deter overseas investment.

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Hellbound Cast & Character Guide: Who's Who In The New Netflix Series? – Collider.com

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Hellbound Cast & Character Guide: Who’s Who In The New Netflix Series?  Collider.com

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Battlefield 2042 Game Update 3: Release Date, Patch Notes, Bug Fixes And More

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Battlefield 2042 Update 3 is next on the agenda of the developers and we have all of the information you need regarding the upcoming patch.

EA and DICE have had to encounter some rough waters so far after coming under intense scrutiny for the game’s release back in November, mainly down to a high amount of glitches and in-game bugs that many players were coming across.

This was during the Early Access period that some gamers had paid almost £100 for, which resulted in the game being implemented with a day one patch, titled Update #1.

Read more: Battlefield 2042’s Metacritic Score Is Woeful Following Horror Launch

While Update #2 did top off some of the gameplay issues, DICE will likely bring along Update #3. But when exactly will it be released?

Scroll down to find out everything that we know so far regarding Battlefield 2042 Update #3:


Release Date

Battlefield 2042 Robot Dog

At the time of writing, it is not yet known when Update 3 will be brought out.

EA are renowned for not giving gamers any warning regarding patches and will just release straight away and state it is available.

This could change so we will update this section as soon as more information emerges in the coming days, weeks and months – so stick with us and stay tuned!


Patch Notes

As mentioned above, the comprehensive list of patch notes from Update 3 have yet to be revealed and will be posted here, as well as all of the respective sections below, as soon as EA and DICE make it public, keep your eyes peeled!


Gameplay

TBC


Bug Fixes

TBC


Click below to see all of the updates that have been added to Battlefield 2042 so far:

Battlefield fans! Are you enjoying Battlefield 2042 so far despite the shaky start? Are you still playing or did you get yourself a refund after the first couple of days? Please get in touch and let us know what you think and EA and DICE’s latest addition to the mass warfare series!


You can find all of the latest Battlefield 2042 News and everything Gaming related right here at GiveMeSport.


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‘You can never say there’s a bottom and they won’t go lower’

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Mitch McConnell tan suit

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky).Drew Angerer/Getty Images

  • McConnell blocked Democrats’ attempt to close debate on defense spending, usually a bipartisan vote.

  • This could push back Democrats’ timetable to get Build Back Better passed before Christmas.

  • Democratic lawmakers are frustrated, saying the GOP will do anything to obstruct Biden’s agenda.

Passing new defense spending was supposed to be the easy part of Congress’ holiday rush, but it’s already run into a stumbling block.

Democrats have an ambitious agenda for the upcoming month. They want to pass a resolution to avoid a government shutdown, raise the debt ceiling, and pass President Joe Biden’s sweeping climate and social-welfare package, all before Christmas. But before any of that gets done, Republicans and Democrats need to work together to pass the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for fiscal year 2022 — a $768 billion annual measure that has been passed on a bipartisan basis every year for 60 years.

That measure ran into trouble on Monday night when Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell blocked Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer’s attempt to close debate on the bill and move it closer to passage.

“This is more important than political timetables or partisan wish-lists,” McConnell said prior to the vote. “So if the Democratic leader insists on forcing a cloture vote later today, I’ll oppose cutting off these important debates prematurely when they have really just begun.”

McConnell said he was blocking the vote because GOP amendments, like sanctions over a Russian pipeline, had yet to be considered. His comments came after Schumer said during remarks that he hoped “Republican dysfunction will not be a roadblock to passing this bill and taking care of our troops and their families.”

If the NDAA doesn’t get passed soon, it will likely throw off Democrats’ plans to get measures like universal pre-K and robust climate policies to the American people before Christmas, and the idea is frustrating Democratic senators.

“You can never say there’s a bottom and they won’t go lower,” Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine told Politico on GOP strategy.

New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen added that GOP efforts are “about a general effort to obstruct anything that’s going on, with the hope that will reflect poorly on Joe Biden.”

The GOP obstruction, as Shaheen referenced, might sound familiar — it’s something Democrats were struggling with just last month while attempting to keep the government funded. Congress came dangerously close to failing to suspend the debt ceiling and pushing the US into default as McConnell blocked Democrats’ attempts to raise the ceiling on their own. He stepped in at the last minute to ensure the country could pay its bills for an additional two months.

However, as Insider reported, while the GOP may be working to delay Democrats’ timetable to pass Biden’s Build Back Better Framework, McConnell appears to be more cooperative with Schumer on the debt ceiling this time around. McConnell told Punchbowl News on Tuesday he recently had discussions with Schumer on ways to keep the government funded, and they’re “still talking about.”

Now, Democrats need to work with Republicans to get defense spending finalized, and while GOP obstruction may be their biggest obstacle in adhering to their Christmas deadline, they still have a lot to resolve within their own party. West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin has been clear he would like to see changes in Biden’s Build Back Better agenda, including cutting out paid leave, and he suggested to Politico that inflation, and the new Omicron variant, should give Congress “cause to pause” on the agenda.

He said: “I heard an awful lot over the Thanksgiving break that prices were high and people were very much upset about that and concerned about: Is inflation going to get worse?”

Read the original article on Business Insider

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